Un semn al timpului sub care traim azi : Iudeii europeni sunt fortati de evenimente sa se intoarca pe Pamantul Fagaduintei

http://blog.ifcj.org/post/helping-ukrainian-family-get-back-their-feet?sm=Blog&s_src=FB&s_subsrc=NFS1500XXEXXX

February 5, 2015 – 3:47 PM
IFCJ

Eva Geller, a Fellowship staff member, shares a story about a family she visited on a recent trip to Kiev, Ukraine:

We met Alexei – a 22-year-old man originally from Lugansk – in a cafe. He didn’t want us to visit his house. He is very suspicious of everyone right now, including us, even though he knew we were trying to help. He was afraid and shaking when we met.

I gave him a cup of coffee, and I immediately noticed that he looked like he was starving. We offered him food and he looked so grateful. He wanted to say so much; there were so many details. But he was scared – he was talking very silently, almost whispering, and he mumbled from time to time as he told his story.

Alexei arrived in Kiev with his wife and their infant son only 10 days ago. In Lugansk, he was a computer programmer for an international company; his wife stayed at home with the baby. But last spring, shootings began to occur regularly in the streets and everything changed. Gangs would get together and attack the police headquarters.

The ongoing violence and gunfire caused the roof of their house to shake, and their windows were smashed in, leaving everything in disarray. For almost a year, his wife stayed at home with their son, never leaving the house; she was afraid to go out. All the shops were closed or destroyed. There was chaos in the streets.

Alexei had planned to start his own business. He had already rented a space, employed workers, and he was just waiting for the bank’s approval. Unfortunately, by early August, the banks were all closed. They are still closed and people can’t access their money and Alexei’s dream is gone.

This family felt the psychological pressures of all the fighting and they decided to leave because there would be no future, no financial security, and no peace in Lugansk. They packed a suitcase and left quickly during the few days of ceasefire. Alexei didn’t tell anyone he was leaving, because his neighbors were anti-Semitic and he worried they might turn on him.

When they arrived in Kiev, he didn’t know to where he could turn for help. Thankfully, The Fellowship is able to help this family, and we provide them with basic necessities such as food and financial assistance. They are currently in the process of making aliyah (immigrating to Israel) and I am so excited for them to get to the Holy Land.

Cu  putin  timp  in  urma  am  citit  despre  evreii  din  Franta, ingrijorati  si  ei  dupa  evenimentul  uciderii  fratilor  lor  intr-un  magazin  din  Paris ,  faptul  ca  si  ei  se pregatesc  de  intoarcere  in  Tara  lor ,  vii  sau  morti ( cele  patru  persoane  victme  la  Paris  au  fost  ingropati  in  Ierusalim ) :

Resurgent Anti-Semitism in Europe

There is growing concern in Israel over the ill
wind blowing from Europe.
“Western Europe is undergoing a wave of
Islamization, of anti-Semitism and of anti-
Zionism,” said Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu.
The appeasement of the Muslims weakens
Europe and strengthens Islam, which is
spreading across the continent. Neither the
Jews nor Israel pose a threat to a free Europe,
in contrast to radical Islam. The world
witnessed how Islamic terrorists in Paris
attacked the offices of Charlie Hebdo in the
name of Allah, followed by the murder of four
Jewish hostages in a kosher grocery.
Europe is being haunted by radical Islam; and
70 years after the Holocaust, Jews once again
do not feel safe. While European leaders denounce
anti-Semitism, they have adopted an
anti-Israel, pro-Muslim agenda. In a symbolic
vote, the European Union Parliament voted
overwhelmingly to endorse a Palestinian
state.
“Another pogrom took place in Europe, not in
the night but in the light of day,” wrote Israeli
journalist Dan Margalit. “This time it was not
a physical attack but a verbal one. The European
Parliament took the Palestinians’ side.
They dictated the borders and the time for
the creation of Palestine. Additionally, they
took Hamas off the list of terrorist organizations.
Thank God they didn’t sign it with
Allah Hu Akbar [Allah is greater].”
Law professor Haim Schein warns that hypocrisy
is flourishing again in Europe, turning
Jews into a familiar scapegoat. “Before the
Holocaust, Jews were held responsible for
the bad economic situation, and today, for
the situation with the Palestinians,” he says.
“This is happening because the Europeans are
afraid of Islam, which is about to conquer the
continent.”
“Again and again Europe forgets everything
else and only cares about the Jews,” writes
Middle East expert Guy Bechor. “That has
been Europe’s hobby for hundreds of years.
The Muslim population of European cities
keeps growing, and with it, anti-Semitism.
Marseille has a population of 40 percent Muslims, Barcelona 30 percent, Brussels 30
and Amsterdam 25. And the big cities are
deciding Europe’s policies. In Brussels, the
capital of the European Union, Islam has
more influence than the Catholic Church.”
Many observers believe relations between
Israel and Europe are going from bad to
worse.
“Israel is tired of Europe’s empty promises,”
says Israel’s UN Ambassador Ron Prosor. “The
Jewish people have a long memory. We will
never ever forget that you failed us in the
1940s [during the Holocaust]. You failed us
[during the Yom Kippur War] in 1973. And
you are failing us again today. Every European
parliamentarian who voted to prematurely
and unilaterally recognize a Palestinian state
is giving the Palestinians exactly what they
want—statehood without peace.”
Prosor recounted how when weapons and
ammunition were running out during the
Yom Kippur War, Europe would not allow
American planes carrying emergency supplies
to Israel to refuel.
All of this has prompted various Israeli
governments to keep Europe out of the peace
process with the Palestinians. On the one
hand the Europeans say they are committed
to Israel’s security, and on the other hand
they support its enemies. The religious media
in Israel point out that Europe has discriminated
against the Jews for centuries and that
hatred of Jews and Israel is deeply ingrained
in the European psyche.
But there is a silver lining. After the attack
on the kosher grocery in Paris, many French
Jews are considering aliyah (immigration) to
Israel.  By Aviel Schneider

Un  alt  articol, pe aceeasi  tema  a  imigratiei  spre  Israel ,  ca  un  semn  al  timpului :

In 1964, as a 15-year-old Jewish American living
in New York, I had the honor of receiving two personal
letters from Israel’s first Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion. His
handwritten notes were in response to two letters I wrote him in
Hebrew to inquire about his controversial statement that all Jews
must move to Israel and that there was no future for the Jewish
Diaspora. After 50 years, my sister found these
letters in my father’s house, letters
which I thought had been lost. Because of
these two letters the seed was planted in
my heart and soul to leave America, leave
my parents and family and make aliyah
to Israel, which I did at age 19 in 1968.
In his first letter, Ben-Gurion explained
“that it is possible for a Jew who
lives abroad to be an honest, decent and
scholarly person just as it is possible that
a Jew who lives in Israel can be a bad, unrighteous
and ignorant person. However,
if a Jew wants to really be a complete Jew,
it is only possible in the Land of Israel…A
Jew who wants to be Jewish in everything
must come here.”
In his second letter, the late Prime
Minister told me: “I’m neither a prophet
nor a fortune teller, but I fear that Jews
in the Diaspora will assimilate as time
goes by if they don’t have relatives in Israel.
I fear that Israel will cease to exist
if the number of Jews does not double or
triple.”
The letters speak for themselves. The
American Jewish population numbered
about 6 million at the end of World War
II. Today in 2015, the Jewish population
in the US is between 5.5 and 6 million despite
the mass immigration of Jews from
the former Soviet Union, Israel, Argentina
and Brazil, among others.
Between this immigration and natural
reproduction, the Jewish population
of America today should have been about
15 million, but instead is stagnant or
shrinking. How do we explain this?
The Jewish People in the Diaspora
have experienced, I believe, two Holocausts:
the first by Nazi Germany
and the Second Holocaust of assimilation.
Intermarriage rates are
between 70 to 80 percent in many
parts of the US. In addition, careeroriented
Jews do not have many children.
This leads to the dissipation of
the minority amongst the majority.
My parents were heartbroken when
I “abandoned” them to be a Zionist and
move to Israel. I did it to ensure that I
would one day marry a Jewish woman
who would bare me Jewish children.
But most Diaspora Jews are very comfortable
staying put in America, Britain,
Australia and elsewhere. The result is the
gradual disappearance of the Jews in the
Diaspora.
However, with increasing Islamic
emigration from the Middle East to
North America and Europe, and their
penchant to “kill the Jews on Saturday
and the Christians on Sunday,” I believe
that Diaspora Jews may not feel so comfortable
anymore and an increasing number
will make aliyah to Israel. The deadly
terrorist attack on a kosher supermarket
in Paris in January is a case in point.
Ben-Gurion said in his second letter
that Israel could not survive unless it
doubled and tripled its population. He
was a prophet: In 1964, Israel’s population
stood at 3 million Jews; today it is
6.3 million and counting.
Soon we may see mass Jewish immigration
to Israel. Islamic terrorism could
be the giant spatula of God to scrape up
the Jews and bring them home to Zion.
By Victor Mordecai

A group of French Jews immigrate to Israel

Posted on 1/20/2015 by Ariel Rudolph

image

Less than a week after the terrorist attack in the Hyper Cacher supermarket in the suburbs of Paris, 24 French Jews made aliyah to Israel. The group arrived at Ben Gurion Airport just days after the attacks took place. Among the immigrants was the family of Johan Cohen, one of the victims of the supermarket attack who was put to rest in the Givat Shaul cemetery in Jerusalem.

The recent terrorist attacks are indicative of an increasingly anti-Semitic atmosphere in France and many French Jews are becoming aware of the fact and are becoming more convinced that they have uncertain future in France. In addition, an unstable economic situation in France, being driven by an increasing rate of unemployment is causing many French Jews to consider emigration to Israel.

„Since the terrorist attack there is an increased interest in emigration to Israel in the French Jewish community”, said Simcha Felber, a representative of the World Zionist Organization (WZO) in France.

According to the Jewish Agency, more and more French Jews will immigrate to Israel in the near future. „The Jewish Agency will help those Jews who decide to move to Israel”, promises its chairman, Natan Sharansky. „It will help them to find work and provide them with professional advice. At the same time, we are working to strengthen the Jewish community in France and to provide more security for Jewish institutions”, said Sharansky.

According to the statistics published by the Jewish Agency, there has been a dramatic increase of the number of immigrants from France to Israel in the past two years. The number of immigrants from France has more than doubled to nearly 7,000 in 2014 over the previous year.

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We are literally watching the Bible unfold before our eyes with the ongoing ingathering of the Exiles to Israel. Jews are returning from the 4 corners of the earth where they blessed the communities where they were living despite centuries of persecution.

Because of the cultural and ethnic differences that new immigrants bring with them when they immigrate, it is more challenging for many of them to adjust to the mix of Western and Middle Eastern life in Israel.

New immigrants often have a difficult time adjusting to life in Israel, finding meaningful employment, provide for their families and fully integrate into Israeli society.

With a gift of love of only $15 you could help Israel Today make them feel welcome, loved and at home in the Land of Israel!

‘Sons of Manasseh’ Returning Home
They call themselves Bnei Menashe (Sons of Manasseh) and they claim a long history reaching back
thousands of years to the time when they lived in ancient Israel. The tribe dwells in northeast India and
while its Jewish roots are debatable, the Bnei Menashe are being drawn back to the Promised Land.
With blue and white flags flying, another
50 immigrants got a festive
welcome at Ben-Gurion International
Airport in December. There are now
more than 2,000 Bnei Menashe in Israel
including 550 who arrived in 2014. It is
further proof that the biblical prophecies
about the return of the exiles are
coming true (see Ezekiel 37). And it is
a clue to the mystery of the Ten Lost
Tribes of Israel.
The Bnei Menashe believe that
they are descendants of the Tribe of
Manasseh, one of the northern Ten
Tribes that was scattered in the 8th
century BC by the Assyrians. However,
some Israelis believe that the group is
immigrating for economic reasons rather
than religious and there are doubts
about their Jewish identity. Therefore,
as was the case with the Ethiopian
immigrants, these Indian newcomers
must first convert to Orthodox Judaism
in order to be fully accepted as Jews.
The story of the Sons of Manasseh
reads like a novel. It begins with the
fall of the Northern Kingdom of Israel
in 721 BC when the Assyrians invaded
the Land. The group’s oral tradition
Kuki began to take note of their Israelite
roots, and this got the attention
of some Orthodox rabbis and groups
seeking to unravel the secret of the
Lost Tribes. This resulted in the first
Bnei Menashe arriving in Israel in 1994
in the face of strong government opposition.
By 2003 immigration came to a
halt, but in northeast India increasing
numbers of the group were converting
to Judaism. Thanks to the efforts of an
Israeli organization called Shavei Israel
(those who return to Israel), members
of the tribe gained official status as olim
hadashim (new immigrants) in 2009,
although their true origins are still in
question.
This is not unique. The Israeli
newspaper Ha’aretz reports that some
14 million people throughout the world
claim to be of Jewish origin or descendants
of the Lost Tribes—nearly equal
to the number of the world’s officiallyrecognized
Jews. Similar groups exist
in Papua New Guinea, South America,
central Africa and Nicaragua. The
growth of these movements is said to be
connected to the spread of Evangelical
Christianity and its apocalyptic beliefs
in the end-time return of the Jewish
people to the Land of Israel, ahead of
the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. 
By Dina Hungerbühler
tells of many hard years of slavery in
the land of their captivity. Looking for
a safe haven, the tribe fled from what
is present-day Afghanistan through the
Hindu Kush Mountains into Tibet.
From there, the tribe split up and
members sought refuge in Vietnam,
Malaysia, Thailand and the Philippines.
Some settled in northern India
and lived in caves, prompting locals to
refer to them as “cavemen.” The group’s
customs gradually merged with those
of the indigenous population, although
biblical traditions were preserved such
as circumcision on the eighth day.
In the 19th century, Christian missionaries
discovered the “Kuki,” as
they were called, and noted that their
tradition included stories very much
like those of the Bible. Because of this
similarity to Christian beliefs, some
converted to Christianity.
In 1951, an Indian Pentecostal pastor
examined the true origins of the Kuki
and approached the Israeli government
with his findings. But his attempts to
make contact with members of the
Knesset (parliament) failed.
Twenty years later many of theKuki began to take note of their Israelite
roots, and this got the attention
of some Orthodox rabbis and groups
seeking to unravel the secret of the
Lost Tribes. This resulted in the first
Bnei Menashe arriving in Israel in 1994
in the face of strong government opposition.
By 2003 immigration came to a
halt, but in northeast India increasing
numbers of the group were converting
to Judaism. Thanks to the efforts of an
Israeli organization called Shavei Israel
(those who return to Israel), members
of the tribe gained official status as olim
hadashim (new immigrants) in 2009,
although their true origins are still in
question.
This is not unique. The Israeli
newspaper Ha’aretz reports that some
14 million people throughout the world
claim to be of Jewish origin or descendants
of the Lost Tribes—nearly equal
to the number of the world’s officiallyrecognized
Jews. Similar groups exist
in Papua New Guinea, South America,
central Africa and Nicaragua. The
growth of these movements is said to be
connected to the spread of Evangelical
Christianity and its apocalyptic beliefs
in the end-time return of the Jewish
people to the Land of Israel, ahead of
the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. 
By Dina Hungerbühler

French Jewish community visits Samaria
They are thinking of making Aliyah as a community. „It’s an important strategic move”, says head of the Shomron Regional Council

Feb 13, 2015, 06:50PM | Omri Ariel
Tell a Friend
A group of French Jewish families visited two settlement blocs this week, both in and over the green line, with the intention of making Aliyah as a community and settling in one or more of those blocs.
The settlements visited by the group are Efrat in Gush Etzion and Yakir in the western Samarian Mountains. Several leaders of the Shomron Regional Council accompanied the group, gave them guided tours and had them meet with other families who had made Aliyah. They also visited schools and neighborhoods in the area.

Head of the Shomron Regional Council Gershon Mesika said: „Many settlements are interested in having the French immigrants live there. We have carefully considered the families’ demands so that the immigration process will be positive to both sides.” Mesika’s deputy, Yossi Dagan, said this is an important strategic move and a national mission. „The fact that these settlements are near major cities appeals to the potential immigrants, as well as realizing their Zionist aspirations.”

Mesika and Dagan went to Paris last summer to meet with the families and present the potential locations to them.

Anunțuri

Despre behaitul oilor si Glasul Pastorului

caci "Oile Mele ascultă glasul Meu; Eu le cunosc, şi ele vin după Mine "...
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